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that would trade places with the united states of america. our problems can be solved in our challenges can be met. the path we offer may be harder but it leads to a better place. i am asking you to choose that future. i'm asking you to rally around a set of goals that create new manufacturing jobs here in ohio. that build on what we have already done, to create a new energy strategy for america. building on what we have already done to improve education and break down our -- and turn the page on a decade of war. that is what we can do in the next four years, cincinnati. that is why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states of america. [cheers and applause] [applause] [chanting] >> now i want everybody to be clear the goals we set our concrete and they are achievable. the first part of the plan is to export more products and outsourced cheaper jobs. after a decade of decline, this country has created a half-million new manufacturing jobs in the last two and half years. a whole lot of them here in ohio. when some of these other folks said we should let detroit go bankru
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
to be realistic about how we can tackle these challenges. if there is a crisis that i see in the united states for the long term, it is not the temporal issue of how we will deal with money. because i am very confident we will be able to deal with that. it is how will we bring that -- bring back our sense of what we can accomplish together as americans when we are realistic about those challenges. that is the thing i think about the word "crisis" in this country. >> mayor castro is not the first to suggest that. for 10 years now, we heard that the government is not asking all of us to do enough. >> it is interesting. the word "sacrifice," when i hear a politician say that, it usually means grab your wallet. it usually means increasing taxes. and i will give president obama credit to in his the first presidential candidate since walter mondale to run explicitly on a platform that he will raise taxes. >> he is saying he will raise taxes on the wealthy. >> according to the supreme court, he already has raised taxes. that was the basis on which the supreme court of held obamacare, that it was a ta
change in the united states and how it's been shifted pretty rapidly over time as the great state of nevada. obama is running ahead of though not nearly as far as he did in 2008. but it still will cut off on my monitor but you can see an incredible increase of nine percentage points for the share of eligible voters who are minorities according to the data between 2008 and 2012. that's a massive demographic tide against the republicans and you can see there's been a decline of five percentage points in the share of voters that are colleges john became group into bills and eight. that is a very quick run through some of the swing states in the 2008 election. maybe it's time for me to step back, catch my breath and just say why is this. why is this going on? why does obama have the lead he does? why is from the having difficulty, and what many people argue should be the core limping along economy and a president that has done so much as the defense and its face it popular at the beginning like the health care reform act and so long, the stimulus looked upon unfavorably by a lot of vo
, but that is critical cause more trouble than any of the problem we've got fiscally in the united states. getting medicare costs under control is the number-one thing. >> you say we also surcharged smokers and the obese for their medicare coverage. where did that idea come from? >> i am the person that put it in the memo but i didn't have to fight very hard for it. also, i ran into this, something i ran in "the washington post" install of calling people morbidly obese i called them mega fatties and i was refuted by "the washington post" for being insensitive, which i guess i probably am. this is another thing where everybody knows this to be true and someone has to pay for it. there should be penalties. i'm not really a democrat but i'm certainly democrat compared to him. you have to be responsible to some extent for your personal behavior. someone is going to pay for it. >> quite right. we should point out also we are not only ones making arguments like this. there are other bipartisan commissions and so forth. the task force that was headed by a was rivlin and pete domenici, a democrat and repu
reauthorization makes plain that discrimination is not the policy of these united states. it says no program funded by federal vawa dollars can turn away a domestic violence victim because of their sexual orientation or their gender identity, whether the victim is gay or straight, american indian, white, black or latino, in my view, madam president, and in the view of so many in this chamber, they deserve protection from abuse and justice for their abusers. there are two other important changes in this vawa reauthorization as passed through the senate. both of which help ensure we bring perpetrators to justice no national who their victims are or where the claims are committed. these help law enforcement to secure needed testimony from victims who are unwilling to come forward due to reasonable fears of deportation. so in total, all three of these important changes to the substance and scope of vawa i think strengthen it, i think carry forward its initial spirit and i think are completely appropriate things for this senate and the house to do in our every five-year reconsideration and reauth
right now . socialized medicine in the united states of america. what is that about care so as it about writing the book to it ocd ronnie touched on this because this was one of the central arguments. as i started to write ipod, well, of course obama is redistributing wealth here tell he is a socialist. in fact, i have a section in the book called this a socialist is a big fat liar. i was on with neil cavuto last week. he said to me, come on. look at this title. cassette, tell me what part of that is inaccurate. he is skinny. he goes on the secret burger runs, but he's not taking any rate. he's a socialist. he's lied to the american people day in and day out. prime example, will cut the deficit in half and my first term we all know how that turned out. he inherited a for under $50 billion annual deficit. he has quadrupled the. every year he's been in office he has run between 13 and $17 trillion annual deficit . added five to international debt and just three years. to give it to see -- this white. it took in three years at 5 trillion. for the first 216 years of the republic that is how
to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 20, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i would yield to my friend from delaware and ask that i be recognized when he finishes his remarks. the presiding officer: the senator from delaware. mr. coons: thank you very much, mr. president. i rise today to express my gratitude to leader reid, to chaplain black, to all of us in the chamber and my gratitude to the reverent dr. dug gerdts. it is my honor and privilege to welcome him to our chamber this morning as one of delaware's finest leaders. reverend gerdts leads the congregation at first and centr
bless america, these united states. thank you very much everybody. i hope you get the book. [applause] mike has agreed to take a couple of questions before we get out of here. the first one, right here. >> we did not bring issues. >> where is chick-fil-a? >> it was getting too cold. we will make the diet that i could hear your answer because there were too many -- prius is clicking by. what was your answer about why they don't have any conservative moderators in the upcoming debate? >> it's a perfect metaphor for the machine we are up against. if you expect this is going to be an easy ride for governor romney, it's not in its unbelievable there are going to be liberals who are going to be moderating the debates. the bardot is a so much higher for governor romney then it is president obama and we know that going in and we have to accept that it's tough. >> the next question over here. 's vi of the quick question. my first question is what is this thing between you and hewitt concerning the -- [inaudible] >> apparently you're not you are not supposed to say his name because he moved the
for the viewrs of others. and he disassociated the united states from the hateful video that was made in california that derotted the prophet mohammed and islam. and the president said this is his main point, he was passionate about it. the americans have an abiding belief in made a compelling case mr.. he also had a message for iran and that is that while we want to negotiate our differences through diplomacy if that's possible, that time is not unlimited. i thought it was a warning to the iranian government is a difficult deal with. i thought it was a important speech that the president gave yesterday in my. >> >> host: how about mitt romney can, you assess from what yoaf heard and have seen over the months. is there anything close to what you might call a romney doctrine on foreign policy? how would you encaps late it? >> guest: he it a smart and successful person. he's been talking about foreign policy. it's not the issue he wants to emphasis in the campaign. he wants the campaign to be obviously about the economy and about our unemployment rate. and it's an unusual position for r
are being smaller and one way you do that as is this idea of having crews fly from the united states to overseas operating theaters to replace each other to a policy sometimes called cruise swaps or think swaps. it's hard to do and in fairness to the navy it's already been done on some ships and in fairness to the navy so i think that's the kind of idea that needs to be expanded and generalize because we need more innovative ways of using late lamented -- limited sources of what we are to have. >> going forward regardless of who is president the administration may change but the math remains the same. there are some hard fiscal issues they will have to deal with an and defense is going to have hard strategic choices and i look forward to getting past the election when we can see whatever administration is in charge and what they start to do in terms of making the strategic choices but the longer you wait the tougher the decisions get. this idea that both sides are pursuing, setting a particular budget target and saying that is what we are going to stick to and fill in the strategy be
enormous pleasure to welcome to the podium united states secretary of education arne duncan. [applause] [applause] >> thank you so much for that kind introduction. you don't want me in the treasury. i'm going keep the remarks brief. i would love to have a conversation with you. i'm thrilled to get in the focus on education. it's important for the country to be engaging in. a lot of challenges and hard work ahead of us. with i think we have a chance to breakthrough in fundamental way. i'll give you a snapshot where we think we are, where we're trying to go and the next stipes. a couple of numbers haunt me. 25% dropout rate in the country. that's a million of kids leaving our schools. no good jobs out there for them. and many of the african and latino that 40, 50, 60%. we are devastating entire communities unless we [inaudible] we used to lead the world in college graduate. today we are 1 4th. we wonder why we are struggling economically. i continue to think about the skill set in a time of employment rates we have as much as 2 million high wage high skills jobs that we can't fill. i thi
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
american forces like we had not seen in years. one of the first mobilizations was our united states military. and they were called to serve bravely in remote corners of the global. 11 years later the mastermind of 9/11, osama bin laden, was taken down, and we now have an al qaeda that is severely diminished, and we are bringing our troops home from that part of the world. but, mr. president, for the troops when they come home, the fight is not over. there's another fight when they get back home to america. it's a different type of battle. the unemployment rate among veterans returning from iraq and afghanistan was just under 11% in august. it's higher for those who are younger, and this problem is likely to continue to grow as we draw down in afghanistan, just like we've already drawn down in iraq. it's worth noting that there have been steps made in the right direction. this past summer we passed legislation that'll help veterans get federal occupational licenses when their military training matches the civilian requirements. that was a bill that i had the privilege of sponsoring.
it was an extraordinary visit would against nixon by times which only one of the person in history of the united states could you give of for or against five times, franklin delano roosevelt. he could vote on the national ticket five times. so if you're in a national audience watching on -- watching on c-span to come to the nixon library. here's my presidential trivia. there are only four colleges in the united states which have graduated presidents and starting quarterbacks in the super bowl. what are those? so good thinking right now. i'll give you the easiest one of wall. the united states naval academy. jimmy carter. that's pretty easy. the university of michigan which i already mentioned, gerald ford and some pretty. of course the starting quarterback for the navy was roger stop back. and if you think, california, it's pretty easy to come up with stanford for much harder graduated and promote jim and john denver graduated, but starting quarterback in the super bowl. then last one is really hard but have given you a clue. have already said his last name. benjamin harrison who matriculated at miami
of the united states, leader of the free world and so my question was how does he do it, how does he decide and make decisions? how does he govern? tom goldstein and "los angeles times" supreme court correspondent david savage diprete view of the supreme court new term starts october 1st. this one hour and 15 minute discussion was part of a forum hosted by the cato institute here in washington earlier this week. >> our conference concludes with a look ahead to october term 2012. the court's docket as of today is a bit sparse, but not without have to. indeed, were it not for last terms obamacare and the sv1070 cases you could say the coming term would be the term of the decade. the first to sittings the court will hear cases on property rights, racial preferences and higher education, and the fourth amendment as well as a follow-up to the class-action blockbuster from a couple years ago, wal-mart for nurses do. cato followed the cases as well as in several other but if granted would be high profile as well. challenges to section 5 of the voting rights act and the scope of the treaty power, f
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
with protecting the united states in particular. the obama administration changed our plans for european missile defense to leverage the existing missile defense system and put that system sure first in romania and poland later on. they also curtailed the ground-based midcourse. they stopped it at 30. i think the wrong administration would actually probably go back and change the balance again, much more in favor of national missile defense systems and we have actually seen in congress, republicans have been pushing the idea of deploying some of these ground-based and interceptors on the united states disclosed. another area of specific differences in shipbuilding. it is an imperfect measure, but the total number of ships in the navy -- it actually reached a low point at 279 ships, i should say. that was in the bush administration in 2007. we have come up since then i think we were about 280 ships right now. the obama administration plans to bring the shift count up to about 300. the goal is still 313. but if you look over 830 year shipbuilding plan, and averages over 30 years. so if we graduall
to be than right here in washington d.c. to do that. well, he joined the united states senate in january of 2011 and he has established himself as a constitutional conservative, pledging to work every day to reform government and as business as usual here in our nation's capital. i'm proud to say he hasn't received a 100% score on the frc action scorecard for the 112th congress, voting to defund obamacare and planned parenthood [applause] he is a devoted father and husband. married to his wife kelly for over 21 years and together they have had the joy of raising three teenage boys, william, duncan and robert. amidst a busy schedule he regulates in volunteers and coaches their baseball and soccer teams. please help me welcome to the stage from the great state of kentucky -- well his dad is from texas. and they both stand for protecting the constitution for which i am extremely grateful. please welcome senators rand paul. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> thank you. can you believe we had trouble getting -- the democrats had trouble getting god into the platform? sounds like there wasn't much dissensi
the united states and it was designed in a way that it didn't require going to the court and the national security agency or others who are trying to wiretap people outside the united states. the problem is that in defining the parameters of what communications would require and what surveillance is required and which ones didn't the statute referred to the technology of the time as communications that were wired in communications over radio, the satellite technology. the problem is in 1978 we see a dramatic change in technology of communications and in particular fiber-optic cables all over the world which is actually very much changed the routing indications that change the requirement, the court order requirements they face when they try to get into electronic surveillance in the result of that is that leading up to 9/11 there are many instances where the government would have to go to the fisa court to get an order from the fisa court for the could electronically surveilled or wiretap someone overseas and that was not the intent of fisa. the intelligence surveillance act the amendment
out i'm not against the rand paul amendment be voted on by the united states senate. i do object to the -- an hour equally divided. i object to the fact that we do not have either side-by-side or second-degree amendments, which is the normal parliamentary procedure. and since -- since the majority leader had to inject the number-one objective is defeat barack obama routine again, i would like to point out, this is the least productive congress since 1947. that we have for the first time in 51 years, we're not taking up the defense authorization bill. for the first time in 51 years, when we are fighting a war in afghanistan, that we can't find the time -- we can't find the time in the united states senate to take up the bill that's so important to the security of this nation. so the majority leader should be proud of his record, as i mentioned, including the fact that this congress is the least productive since 1947, but most of all, in 50 years -- in 50 years -- we have not taken up the defense authorization bill and we've taken it up for 50 years because other majority leaders w
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
that threatens the very viability of the united states senate. last july the obama administration used the flimsiest of arguments, granted themselves the authority to waive federal welfare work requirements. and whether or not what they, the obama administration intends to accomplish with these waivers is good welfare policy has been the subject of robust debate. i'm not here to argue the merits or lack thereof of the underlying welfare policy goals of the obama administration. what i am here to do is to make a plea to my fellow senators, as senators we simply cannot let this action stand. if we fail to stand together as senators in defense of our constitutional duty to be the ones to draft legislation, we might as well pack up our bags and go home, because we will have opened the door for this administration and future administrations to unilaterally decide they can waive precedent, congressional intent, and actual legislative language as senators have scrupulously debated and compromised on. if we do not stand together as the united states senate, we will be ceding our authority to t
. there was no clear consensus about what is the ultimate goal of the united states and europe. is the goal of the one hand or is this just a customs union? it's so dissimilar as many have pointed to the formation of the united states. but here again the idea was let's not try to reach agreement on the end result because there is no consensus but let's take a step at a time and develop the institutions necessary as the problems come up. what wasn't perceived as the context of which the huge decisions would have to be taken was the mother of all financial crises from the united states. so, the pressures are far greater than we are anticipating and the year being forced into making big decisions. we are going to find out if they are willing to make the sacrifices necessary to sustain and. yesterday the peterson institute presented an interesting study of spain and italy whether it was sustainable the conclusion is of the plausible scenarios and the answer is yes. under the circumstances it seemed to me surprising if the project would be abandoned in a sense in that context. >> we and interesting meeting
introduced that topic as a very essential topic of the foreign policy of the united states. it was not theory. it became a reality. and one by one the countries of derision which were not used to elections or not used to democratic governments for many years and decades suddenly one after the other started to become democratic governments. and, of course, after he left the presidency he didn't go home to write memoirs and maybe play some golf. he has a beautiful house, i enjoy to visit you. he decided to be, continue being a big player many -- in supporting the same principles, human rights and democracy. and we see president carter going from one country to another observing elections. he has the ability to have the possibility to talk in friendly, in a friendly way with different actors in the region. i have witnessed that. it could be that maybe some actors are antagonist to the united states. maybe some of the actors do have different views about how the world should function. or different cultures about what democracy is. but president carter has the talent, the ability, the wisdom to in
are talking the. they are manufactured within the united states or elsewhere. .. each one of those elements are probably designed in multiple countries most likely manufacture the components in multiple countries. they were integrated components in multiple countries, and that becomes the particular product. any one of these tablets or computers or smart phones that you have has likely touched more than 40 countries along the way. is it really possible to talk about an indigenous manufacturing them as we are managing the risk? the distribution. we need to think about secure distribution channels that distribution of all of the multiple components coming into another component that then goes to market, and when we think about that distribution channel and that procurement channel, we need to give the vendors credit that they actually have vetted their suppliers and those distribution channels because they don't want counterfeit products getting to market, so we need to use their trusten channel partners, their value added resellers and or off of the vetted tables of gsa and at the end of the
first. so of not red or blue states, what the united states. i no they're not that many football fans here today. my first story about president obama has to do with football. he was the last interview that i did for my book. i interviewed three andrew and 50 people will for him and traveled the world. i thought about what i would -- how i would break the ice with him for a long time. i remembered that he is a bears fan than i am a pakistan and that two years ago when the packers played the bears in the nfc championship game president obama announced that if the bears won he was going to the super bowl. the packers won. and the star player on the packers after the game got up on the table of the jesse berman said, president obama will come see us, but we're right to go see him at his house meeting if you win the super bowl you to visit the white house. this was their star quarterback, so when i finally got my interview with president obama and shook his hand and said, mr. president, charles got here before me, but i'm glad we both finally made it. he said, yeah, man, those packers wer
. they are people like corporal dare onterrell hicks, united states army, from hawley, north carolina, who died july 19 of 2012, just two months ago. darian was a 2009 graduate where he was a standout students, loved and respected by all. darian always wanted to be a soldier. it was a goal he set early on and something that everyone remembers about him. it was a goal he pursued with diligence and honor. he was a model junior rotc student who was voted mr. junior r.t.c. by his peers. -- rotc by his peers. darian is remembered as the kind of young man a teacher wishes all their students were like. he was a boy you wanted your children to be friends with. he became the kind of man we should all be thankful to have in this world. when i was speaking with his mom, address, she said -- tracy, she shared with me he never gave her a problem, ever. corporate hicks enlisted in the army after graduating from high school. he loved the army and it seemed he had found his place in life. he loved his family and he kept in close contact with his mother. whenever he spoke with his mom, she would always tell him, alw
in the united states senate where i've worked with many republicans to do important things like cutting spending, putting a cap on federal spending, like banning earmarks, like cutting taxes, over a trillion dollars for small businesses and working families. cleaning up war contracting and protecting and promoting american jobs. todd has worked closely with michele bachmann, and together them and a few others have really pushed things that would really harm missouri families. on march 8th of 2011, todd akin said i don't like social security, i think it's a bad investment. he's gone on in this campaign to delineate what is the triple whammy to social security. not only does he not like it, he would privatize it, put it on the roller coaster of wall street. he would raise the retirement age, and he would lower the benefit. on august 18th of 2011, he said medicare was unconstitutional. and since that time he has, in fact, voted several times to voucherrize medicare, to turn seniors over to private insurance companies, to arm wrestle with them for coverage and whether their claims will be paid and m
a second obama term and how the united states -- thanks. >> brief word on that. iran policy is going to be close to the center of this but let me make a more specific answer with the matter todd raised. missile defense. the obama administration would be interested in finding a way to smooth relations with russia over subsequent stages to european missile defense architecture. i don't know if president obama could just give vladimir putin a veto. i also don't think he is going to feel a hypothetical plan for 2018 developed a couple years ago needs to be seen and set in stone where governor romney because of his strong views towards russia would see it as a way to establish in backing off on the campaign trail even if language about russia and the top geostrategic threat was overstated and not something he chose for the convention speech but made it pretty clear in that speech that he does see the need to stand up to russia and european missile defense is an important case in point. the other thing i will mention is on strategic nuclear arms control. of the three people i have been men
. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i first want to say oddly the congress of the united states should stay in sessioning sessie resolve the issue of sequesteration and other issues like the debt limit and the fiscal cliff we face. i'll vote against adjournment tomorrow. i'll say first that i think i differ with a lot of the colleagues and think we are capable of more cuts in the department of defense. i disagree in the mapper they'll be done through sequester, that it's going to fall disproportionally on weapons and equipment that are so vital to our fighting forces, but let me say, first, that i think perspectively, i would like to see cuts. i think the department of defense is far too top heavy. more admirals and ships in the united states navy, and it's that top heavy across the board in the other services as well. i think we ought to look at some of the permanent overseas military bases we have. 79,000 troops still in europe where they are spending our nato allies, spending less than 2% of the economy on defense. we're at 4.2%. south korea, 28,000 troops, we're at 4.7% of defense spend
it, but the headline is, "life expectancy shrinks for less educated whites in the united states." and let me quote -- generally speaking, the trend for life expectancy in the united states and all over the world has been going up. and the goal of a good society and a strong health care system is to see that people live longer, healthier, happier lives. but as a result of the devastating attacks in a variety of ways on the working class of this country over a period of years, over a period of years, not just starting yesterday, this is where we are. let me quote from this article, and i hope people hear this because this is really shocking stuff. and i quote: "the steepest declines in life expectancy are for white women without a high school diploma who lost five years of life between 1990 and 2008." whose life expectancy went down by five years. this is astronomical. and going back to the article it says, "said jay oshanski, a public health professor at the public university of illinois in chicago and the lead investigator on the study published last month in 'health affairs,' "
, and he is the president of the united states. wilson, he is sick. but he sends his secretary of state to the convention to emcee the convention. >> host: he wanted the nomination. >> guest: he wanted the nomination, and harding, coolidge, hoover, fdr is on the ticket as a vice presidential candidate, and so you have this hook and so much else going on with the league of nations and everything other thing. and 1960, we move on to where you have three titanic personalities. we don't have six but we have three of the biggest name brands in presidential personalities ever. kennedy, nixon, johnson, and so very, very different. so very, very different amibitions in terms of personal, and something which i think resonates so much with folks who are reading books today. 1948, a great cliffhanger, and we love to listen to the experts and get the weather reports, and they're always wrong, and the polls are always wrong, and the experts are always wrong, and by god we love it when we're smarter than they are, and it turns out we can look back in hindsight and see how wrong they were in 1948. and
want to thank senator gillibrand for bringing this moment to the attention of the united states senate and the american people and thank senator rubio, senator durbin for being here. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years. it's hard to believe it's been 40 years since that tragic event in which terrorists had the attention of the world in the olympics at munich. and it's hard to believe over the last 40 years we've experienced so much of the violence from extremists and terrorists, tomorrow we will commemorate the 11th anniversary of the attack on our own country, and we recognize that the only way that we can stand up to this type of extremism is to never forthe get. -- forget and dere-dedicate ourselves to do everything we can to root out extremists, to root out terrorists and to never forget the consequences of their actions. so i want thank senator gillibrand and senator rubio for the resolution that we passed in this congress, to let those who were victimized 40 years ago to know that we won't forget them and we continue to dedicate our efforts to root out this type of hatred, th
there was a bill in the united states senate. and what it would do is extend tax cuts for 98% of the families here in massachusetts and 97% of small businesses. and senator brown voted no. now why did he vote no? because they weren't enough tax breaks for the top 2% and the top 3%. for me this is just an example of whose side you stand on. are you holding out? are you hanging in there for the top 2%? are eager to fight for working people. >> excuse me. with all due respect, you're misrepresenting my record. and the only person in this race he was hurt in the middle class wants to raise taxes as professor warren. she would not have supported president obama's compromise bill that not only kept taxes low for everybody for the last two years, but also take care of an employment benefits. she would not have supported that because the fee increases -- sorry, the fact we didn't tax more a high income earners. so she would've been about taxing one taxpayer middle-class people. this is about 700,000 jobs. i did make those numbers up, but 3.4 trillion are all things you have said. he won another million in
announcing in the quietest most resurgent way possible that i'm grateful to live in the united states of america. that's all. gratitude for the sacrifices of my forebears. gratitude for the opportunity this country a force. gratitude for the men and women who served to fight in the military probably. gratitude for being a part of this amazing, ennobling experience representative democracy. blood, liberals hate the americans event is just okay. not good, not great. serving unexceptional. just okay. conservative women, mouthy ladies. to see some truly a lover i want, in your next conversation with a liberal, i was thinking about something sarah palin said the other day. stanback. led to the huffing and puffing and sighing and moaning begin to get as much as you finish the set by the way. you could say sarah palin likes chocolate ice cream or sarah palin thanks panda bears are cuddly. the result is going to be a kind of deranged automatic rejection of anything sarah palin says or thinks. try with ann coulter. same reaction. actually try with any well-known female who is unapologetically
, which says, the judicial power of the united states shall be vested in one supreme court and such inferior courts the congress may from time to time ordain and establish. and that is as article iii goes on and talks a bit about the jurisdiction of the court and so on, but many, many unanswered questions, including for instance no mention of the chief justice in article iii. we only inferred that are supposed to be a chief justice because he is given in article article ii, the presidential article, the right to preside over -- not the right, the duty to preside over the impeachment trial in the senate of the president of the united states. and remember, william rehnquist did that in the bill clinton impeachment trial and when he was later asked what it had amounted to, he said i did nothing in particular and i did it very well. so the duties of the chief justice are undefined. and much about the supreme court initially with undefined. so it really had to create itself and it's done so not in a straight line progression, but it's done so true askew says some of the cases th
used to describe what the united states has become. he used the word bhutan me. he said the u.s. is now a bhutan me. >> host: a combination of bhutan me and -- >> guest: it's a less excitable work -- word that there are few bhutan amaze amaze around the world characterized by a tremendous concentration of wealth at the top and a wealth that is greater than the bottom 90% of that is what he used. he said that in who is going to buy products and that is who is going to drive the economy, the middle-class is not as important as it once was. >> host: using the book for people who make less than $200,000, they don't count. >> guest: in the eyes of the hedge fund people, these are headphone -- hedge fund people talking. and you can understand where they're coming from. the middle class in china dwarfs the middle class now. the middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and it is why they say the u.s. is irrelevant. >> guest: there are is looking for growth. that is the heart of the whole financial aristocracy. they want growth in stocks and they want the companies that have the multinational
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
. to some degree that is largely sitting on the united states. so won't imf put more pressure on the state u.s. congress to approve the change in the coming weeks and how confident are you that we're likely to see the completion of this reform before the annual meeting is at dover as the imf has plans? thanks. >> well, it's not just the united states. clearly there are others including energy 20 countries that has not yet ratified the reform that was committed to by the leaders in 2010. so it's not the u.s. issue. everyone focuses on the us because the u.s. has a very sizable quota in the institution and is my largest member, my largest shareholder if you will. but the u.s. is not alone in that camp. i certainly hope that the u.s. authorities at large, including congress, with appreciate how needed u.s. leadership is and how needed the imf role is going forward in order to address not the sort of remote crisis around the world, but the indirect consequences of those remote crisis is around the world, including on the u.s. economy. i think if there's one thing that we are learning from all th
what the united states became using the word "plutonamy." that's less -- let's say excitable word, but his point was, there are a few plutonamy's around the world and its cakessed by a tremendous amount of wealth at the top and a wealth that's greater than the bottom 90%. that's what he used. he said that's who will buy product and who drives the economy and the middle class is just not as important as it was. >> host: for people who make less than $200,000 they don't count. >> guest: they are irrelevant in the eyes of the hedge fund people. these are hedge fund people talking. you can understand where they are coming from. the middle class dwarfs the middle class in india, brazil, you name it. it's why they say the u.s. is irrelevant in that sense. >> guest: they are always looking for growth. that's the heart of the whole financial movement. they want growth. they want growth in stocks. they want the companies that have the multinational connections and operations and revenue streams. that's where they want growth. that's why they see the middle class of china and india in parti
was then president of yale university, said the united states has quote offended providence because we formed our constitution without any acknowledgment of god unquote and yet in spite of this overwhelming historical evidence the founders did indeed strive for that separation that thomas jefferson spoke of. most religious right leaders today continue to mock the very concept of a secular state. as the rc at -- ozzie and harriet world, the more religious right extremists have become more and more shrill about the cultural changes that have taken place over the past few decades and that will surely continue and their increasing contempt for social tolerance and personal liberty which are really hallmarks of a limited government they profess to believe in indicates i think that they're no longer reliable partners are allies for those republicans and conservatives who actually do believe in limited government and individual rights. i think the so-called three-legged stool symbolizing the republican, the traditional republican coalition made up of economic conservatives, national conservatives and so
just recording in my mouth at a wall street investment banker used to describe the united states has become. he used the word metonymy. >> host: combination of autocracy -- >> guest: he wanted his own word. it is a less excitable words and plutocracy. at his point was there are a few platonic meets around the world and they are followed by a tremendous concentration of wealth, greater than all in the bottom 90%. and he said that is who's going to buy products. that is who's going to drive the economy. >> host: i think you say in the book for people who make less than $200,000, they don't count. >> guest: and this is in the eyes of the hedge fund people. these are hedge fund people talking. and you can understand why they're coming from. the middle class in china endorse the middle class. middle class in india, brazil, you name it. and that's why they say the u.s. is kind of irrelevant. >> host: thermos looking for growth. that's the part of the whole stock receipt. they want growth with companies took the multinational connect in such operations and revenue streams. that's where they
the pledge of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, september 19, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten e. gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform the duties of the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now move to proceed to calendar number 499, s. 3521, which is the tax extenders legislation reported out of the finance committee previously. the presiding officer: the clerk will report. the clerk: motion to proceed to calendar number 4, s. 3521, a bill amend the internal revenue code of 1986 to extend certain expiring provisions. mr. reid: madam president, following my remarks and those of my distinguishe
across the border. you feel the companies that used to be in the united states. the rod down there now. thousands and thousands of them. i don't know of any mexican company coming up here making any factories. so it's been a disaster for us and the danger is not everybody in washington figures that out. there are some people still walking around saying that was a great idea. there was nafta, captain and the workers got the shaft. >> what are your goals for negotiate a contract with ups, the largest teamster employer? >> i've can also be nearing the two of us will negotiate the contract. were very proud that this week we had -- last week we had rank-and-file members and from all over the country. ups come ups freight. we had the leadership income of 10 surveys. with a good idea were elected with the contract and is going to be basically we think we can get a good contract, but it's going to be more wages, more pensions and i think pensions will be an important level. we want to maintain health care. health care from this day and age is tremendously important to families. they have to ha
be defunded. and by that time the largest affiliate in the united states was city year. the governor of massachusetts, mitt romney, was on the board. and then send me a letter saying, michael brown is nodding his head, sent me a letter saying, with 49 other, 40 other governors, we should continue this. this is important. so i called him and i was out of the white house and i said governor, i love city year. that's what americorps is all about. i hope you'll help me save it. and he urged the republican congress to continue to support city year, and he urged the white house to do it. and they did. i just visited a city year program in south africa, johannesburg, where the youth unemployment rate exceeds 40%, but 80% of the city year volunteers in johannesburg had a job that day they leave city year. so it turns out to be good economics as well as good for the society. all of you should know that, and i wanted you to know what. and, governor, i thank you for being here. the podium is yours. [applause] >> thank you, mr. president. it's an honor to be here this morning. and i appreciate y
and civil service professionals who represent the united states around the globe. the presiding officer: without objection, the senate will proceed to that measure. mr. durbin scwarks i further ask the resolution be agreed to, the preamble be agreed to, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the table with no intervening action or debate and any related statements be printed in the record as if read. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: i understand there is a bill at the desk. i ask for its first reading. the presiding officer: the clerk will read the title of the bill for the first time. the clerk: h.r. 3949, an act to extend the fisa amendments act of 2008 for five years. mr. durbin: i now ask for a second reading and in order to place the bill on the calendar, i object to my own request. the presiding officer: the objection is heard. the title of the bill will be read again on the second legislative day. mr. durbin: i ask unanimous consent when the senate completes its business today, it adjourn until 2:00 p.m. on monday, september 17, 2012, for a pro forma session.
in the united states and how it can shift the state's rapidly over time, grace state of nevada. obama is running ahead, not nearly as far as he did in 2008. look at this data. unfortunately it is caught up in the monitor, but you can see that an incredible increase of nine percentage points in the share of eligible voters who are minorities took place according to the data between 2008 and 2012, a massive demographic tide against which the republicans have to run. you can also see that a decline of five percentage points in voters who are white non college which of course john mccain's best corporate 2008. so that is a very quick to work, very quick speed run on some of the swing states of the 2008 election. maybe it's time for the 2012 election, step back, catch my breath and to say, why is this? why is this going on? why is obama have a solid lead like he does? why is romney having such difficulty finding traction? what many people argue to be a very winnable election with up poor, limping along economy in the president who has done some legislative things that, let's face it, or not all that
of the united states, barack obama. >> we have got a chance to make history in january 3. be a part of it. make showed to show up to caucus. let's go change the world. [applause] nice t-shirt. >> given enough time on camera any person who deals with it, this is a great example of it. you will not be able to resist saying that. you are just programmed to do that. so i think these things are real and they are very endearing and we kept it up through campaign on the internet and tried to maintain that into the white house but that is one thing started to get a little rough because on a campaign we had a lot of resources and technology and things we celebrated but coming to the white house, i went from a staff of six to having a staff of one which is six times less i think. i don't know exactly. i was then not able to envision projects because what was happening, look at the first real i was showing you. isaac ululating all these awesome shots of the president punching the easter bunny but i didn't have this 32nd campaign commercial venue to put this material out so i just started sitting on more a
in the united states are not decided by the popular vote. instead, we have the electoral votes where everybody gets another vote for the states that allocate their electrical votes will so that gives us outcomes in a number of battleground states. this is as we laid it out in the first case. we have six states in the midwest area, ohio, michigan, and ohio, states in the southwest, colorado, new mexico and nevada. virginia and florida in the south. all of the states are pretty different. the six states in the midwest are much more heavy and have a slow level of demographic change and they are more bechler changing slowly. that is favorable in showing preference for barack obama could with that in mind, let's look at some of the particular swing states that are in play. more than any other state, perhaps ohio is one of the pogroms. a state that was believed to be for mitt romney, but if obama holds all six electoral votes, he is only four electoral votes short of victory. critical romney strategy in the state of ohio. that is not happening at this point. at this point, some of the data on the bo
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